Joselito
en el columpio.
Joselito
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»Ponyo 
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leqalize-murder:

Apartments in Hong Kong
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milledorge:

Sketching some cacti
milledorge:

Sketching some cacti
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orlandaspleasure:

Cacharel
Spring 2013 RTW
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gills:

lauren collings
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strangebiology:

Speculative Evolution in the Media
Speculative evolutionis the art and science of hypothesizing about how animals will evolve or would or could have evolved if history had taken an alternate route.
What if the the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs had never struck? What will animals look like in 10 million years? How were pterosaurs colored? There’s no way to know for sure; there are limitations on how we can interpret such sparse input that we get from fossils. But with these remains, consideration of how modern animals look and act, as well as a dose of creativity, we can speculate.Pictured above are selections from Dougal Dixon’s 1988 book The New Dinosaurs: An Alternative Evolution, which is available in its entirety online. Dixon, who is credited with having created the field of speculative biology, considered in The New Dinosaurs how life on earth would look today if not for the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction. The top image, the Lank, could represent how some pterosaurs would have evolved, losing their wings and taking to the ground to fill a niche and phenotype very similar to a modern giraffe. 
In 2003, the Discovery Channel/Animal Planet aired The Future is Wild, which speculated on what earth would look like millions of years after humans had left. The Discovery Channel consulted with dozens of scientists, including Dixon, producing fantastical animals such as a flying fish called the “flish” and a gibbon-like squid called the squibbon.
In 2012, Darren Naish, K.M. Kosemen and Jon Conway published All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and other Prehistoric Creatures, which takes a critical look at how paleoartists portray prehistoric animals. The artists speculate on some of the more strange possibilities that are typically not drawn by those illustrating the animal, because they are impossible to confirm by fossils alone. Perhaps protoceratops climbed trees, perhaps herbivores hunted occasionally. The sequel, All Your Yesterdays: Extraordinary Visions of Prehistoric Animals by a New Generation of Paleoartists is free, suggesting a donation, to view and download online.
strangebiology:

Speculative Evolution in the Media
Speculative evolutionis the art and science of hypothesizing about how animals will evolve or would or could have evolved if history had taken an alternate route.
What if the the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs had never struck? What will animals look like in 10 million years? How were pterosaurs colored? There’s no way to know for sure; there are limitations on how we can interpret such sparse input that we get from fossils. But with these remains, consideration of how modern animals look and act, as well as a dose of creativity, we can speculate.Pictured above are selections from Dougal Dixon’s 1988 book The New Dinosaurs: An Alternative Evolution, which is available in its entirety online. Dixon, who is credited with having created the field of speculative biology, considered in The New Dinosaurs how life on earth would look today if not for the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction. The top image, the Lank, could represent how some pterosaurs would have evolved, losing their wings and taking to the ground to fill a niche and phenotype very similar to a modern giraffe. 
In 2003, the Discovery Channel/Animal Planet aired The Future is Wild, which speculated on what earth would look like millions of years after humans had left. The Discovery Channel consulted with dozens of scientists, including Dixon, producing fantastical animals such as a flying fish called the “flish” and a gibbon-like squid called the squibbon.
In 2012, Darren Naish, K.M. Kosemen and Jon Conway published All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and other Prehistoric Creatures, which takes a critical look at how paleoartists portray prehistoric animals. The artists speculate on some of the more strange possibilities that are typically not drawn by those illustrating the animal, because they are impossible to confirm by fossils alone. Perhaps protoceratops climbed trees, perhaps herbivores hunted occasionally. The sequel, All Your Yesterdays: Extraordinary Visions of Prehistoric Animals by a New Generation of Paleoartists is free, suggesting a donation, to view and download online.
strangebiology:

Speculative Evolution in the Media
Speculative evolutionis the art and science of hypothesizing about how animals will evolve or would or could have evolved if history had taken an alternate route.
What if the the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs had never struck? What will animals look like in 10 million years? How were pterosaurs colored? There’s no way to know for sure; there are limitations on how we can interpret such sparse input that we get from fossils. But with these remains, consideration of how modern animals look and act, as well as a dose of creativity, we can speculate.Pictured above are selections from Dougal Dixon’s 1988 book The New Dinosaurs: An Alternative Evolution, which is available in its entirety online. Dixon, who is credited with having created the field of speculative biology, considered in The New Dinosaurs how life on earth would look today if not for the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction. The top image, the Lank, could represent how some pterosaurs would have evolved, losing their wings and taking to the ground to fill a niche and phenotype very similar to a modern giraffe. 
In 2003, the Discovery Channel/Animal Planet aired The Future is Wild, which speculated on what earth would look like millions of years after humans had left. The Discovery Channel consulted with dozens of scientists, including Dixon, producing fantastical animals such as a flying fish called the “flish” and a gibbon-like squid called the squibbon.
In 2012, Darren Naish, K.M. Kosemen and Jon Conway published All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and other Prehistoric Creatures, which takes a critical look at how paleoartists portray prehistoric animals. The artists speculate on some of the more strange possibilities that are typically not drawn by those illustrating the animal, because they are impossible to confirm by fossils alone. Perhaps protoceratops climbed trees, perhaps herbivores hunted occasionally. The sequel, All Your Yesterdays: Extraordinary Visions of Prehistoric Animals by a New Generation of Paleoartists is free, suggesting a donation, to view and download online.
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